Politics

High Court to deliver verdict on Rosmah’s solar case today


Judge Mohamed Zaini Mazlan is expected to deliver the judgment at 9am on whether the wife of former prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak will be acquitted or found guilty on all three charges. — Bernama photo

KUALA LUMPUR (Sept 1): All eyes will be on the High Court here today as it is scheduled to give the verdict on the case involving Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor who is facing three corruption charges involving a RM1.25 billion hybrid solar project for 369 rural schools in Sarawak.

Judge Mohamed Zaini Mazlan is expected to deliver the judgment at 9am on whether the wife of former prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak will be acquitted or found guilty on all three charges.

However, Rosmah filed a last-minute application two days ago to recuse Judge Mohamed Zaini from hearing or making a decision on the case.

She filed the application on the grounds of the purported leaked judgment of her case which was prepared by another party that was viralled by the mass and electronic media last Aug 26 .

It was learnt that the High Court will deal with the application first today.

On Feb 18 last year, Rosmah, 70, was ordered to enter her defence on the three charges after the prosecution succeeded in proving a prima facie case against her.

She was charged with soliciting RM187.5 million in gratification and two counts of receiving bribes totalling RM6.5 million from Jepak Holdings Sdn Bhd former managing director Saidi Abang Samsudin.

The bribes were allegedly received through her former aide Datuk Rizal Mansor, as a reward for helping Jepak Holdings to secure the Hybrid Photovoltaic Solar System Integrated Project, as well as the maintenance and operation of diesel generator sets for 369 Sarawak rural schools worth RM1.25 billion from the Education Ministry through direct negotiation.

The prosecution is led by senior deputy public prosecutor Datuk Seri Gopal Sri Ram, while lawyer Datuk Jagjit Singh is leading the defence team.

Fifteen reporters, one from each selected media organisation, were given passes to be in the courtroom. Passes were also issued to 35 other newsmen, including the foreign press, for them  to follow the proceedings via a video link in another room.

As the high-profile case has caught wide attention locally and internationally, the court also provided 60 passes to photographers and videographers from each media organisation, which allow them to be at the lobby of the Kuala Lumpur Court Complex. — Bernama










Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.